Tag | books Posts

*Moved to: Studying for the new jobI will be starting a new job in around a month and I wanted to get up-to-speed with the technologies that the new company want to be using. To start with I have had a look at a number of certifications: Technology Specialist: BizTalk Server 2006 Technology Specialist: Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, Application Development Technology Specialist: Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, Configuration These will be on top of the MCPD: Enterprise Applications Developer exams ...
It is traditional to open beginning computer programming books with a 'Hello World!' application. I'm sure the practice has continued throughout the world of blogs, and I am merely following the herd in determining what to write at the start of a blogging career. Since I've started following the blogs a few years ago, I've come to realize that I really need to work on my communication skills. I'm the typical hyper-introvert software guy and I feel that I'm in a position where I'm not going to grow ...
For those of you interested in using the Prince2 distance learning method I have found a very interesting site that specialises in IT Governance courses, books and more. They have information on Prince2, ITIL, ISO27001 and more. The site is suprisinlgy called itgovernance . Just click here to be taken directly to the Prince2 distance learning section of the site ...
Bill Gates gave the commencement speech for Harvard this year, and it's fantastic! He speaks about how important it is for the brightest minds of today to be utilized in fixing the biggest problems we have today, and not just as more tools to further the capitalistic juggernaut (that's my interpretation, not necessarily Gates' opinion). If Gates was just the big Microsoft guy, this would all sound hypocritical; but he's not. He's poured insane amounts of his own money into charity work, and although ...
My last post on this topic generated some great comments (and a nod on another blog). Justice Gray made an interesting point about the covers. He said: "Your comment on this book thing reminded me of a different topic: why the <insert name of red-covered books here> always feature a bunch of totally homely looking dudes." And this goes back to what my original post was about: my quest to add some pizzazz back to the technology section of your local bookstore! Seriously, consider the following: ...
So while investigating some AJAX/File Uploading goodness, I came accross Pete Freitag's blog. I noticed on his side panel, along with his blog categories, links to what he's reading, etc., he has an item called "Get Your Goodies" and underneath is a picture of some chocolate donuts with some heavenly whipped-cream looking substance on top, and some logo called FusionKit. Immediately I think to myself "Well, this must be some interesting little NY bakery that all the kewl geeks go to for their mid-day ...
*Moved to: Becoming a better developer...Steve Clements has tagged me (thanks Steve) about how to become a better developer, he thinks tagging me 'would make an interesting read'..Hmm, no pressure: Actually study for my MCPD: Enterprise Applications Developer like I said I would. I posted earlier in the year that I was going to study for my MCPD: Enterprise Applications Developer and that I was going to start with Exam 70–536: TS: Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 - Application Development Foundation. ...
Check out the great new line-up of BizTalk books now available... Get them here -->BizTalk 2006 ...
Normalization 1. A table should have an identifier. A table should store only data for a single type of entity. A table should not have repeating values or columns 4. A table should avoid nullable columns Choosing a SQL Server Monitoring Tool SQL Profiler Enables you to monitor server and database activity (for example, number of deadlocks, fatal errors, tracing stored procedures and Transact-SQL statements, or login activity). You can capture SQL Profiler data to a SQL Server table or a file for ...
With all the "Become a Better Developer" movement going around, alot has been said about which technology books should be read. I'm going to offer a few books I read that aren't technical, but are still very relevant to our field. Bad Boy Ballmer - The Man Who Rules Microsoft (Fredric Alan Maxwell) Anyone who knows me knows that I'm a HUGE Steve Ballmer fan. Sure he throws chairs at employees who leave for Google, and sure he keeps his kids from buying anything Apple...but if you want to understand ...
You're probably looking at the title of this post wondering how spicing up baby making sex relates to becoming a better developer. First, you should really go and read George's post first to get some context around this. Read it? Great... So over the last few months I've been trying to sink my teeth into some Tech books as part of my becoming a better developer. I sympathize with George in that tech books can sometimes become difficult to plow through. To use another analogy, its like working out: ...
I heard about Xiine on .NET Rocks and figured I would see what all the hype is about. It is a reader for magazines, books and other formatted content built on .NET 3.0 technologies including WPF. Future releases are also support RSS from what they were saying on the show. I have to say that the interface is pretty clean. The one thing that I notice is missing from the current release is discoverability from within the application directly. The main navigation uses a bread crumb menu, which I find ...
Seriously. Reading the entire way through a tech book is hard. I'm currently working on reading Code Complete as part of meeting one of my goals for "Becoming a Better Developer". This has become the one goal that I am having a serious struggle to finish this month. It's one of the hardest things I have done recently. I'm talking deadline is in a few days and you just realized that extra little feature you added during the final stages of the project when you knew you shouldn't but figured it wouldn't ...
So not only has Justice's little "Become a better developer in 6 months" garnered him the attention of Scott H., but he's now featured in one of the MSDN Canada podcasts (which you can get all the links from via Justice's site here). I thought I'd listen and offer my thoughts on the witty banter and intellectual exchange between John Bristowe and Justice Gray. Let's begin... I can picture Justice lying in bed, listening to John speak his intro over and over and over... "Oh yes John, tell me how wonderful ...
Recently I was tagged by Russ on the Justice Gray challenge. Personal Something I have been attempting over the last few years is to be healthier. What does that mean? Well for my wife and I that means making healthier decisions when we eat. We find the good substitutes. Over the past two years we realize that is not enough. A healthy diet is a good step in the right direction, but you need that level of exercise to be the catalyst for a healthy lifestyle. -I think I want to run in something, probably ...
Hell is other people, and Dev.Hell is no exception. While I feel secure in saying that most of the unnecessary strife faced by development comes from immature practices and corporate short-sightedness, there are plenty of problems that come from those of us who live down in the code; demons or damned souls both. Let's start with what developers are not: Developers are not lazy. Devs love technology, they love code, they love working... because working is playing. When devs become discontent it is ...
As I write this, it's only 14 hours and change until the release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Some people have managed to get their hands on a copy already through various means. So, since I'll be reviewing that next week, I wanted to go ahead and get my review out of the movie. I saw it last Friday, but just haven't made the time to review it yet. First, let me say that I was a little apprehensive about this movie for several reasons. It's based on my least favorite of the six books ...
I have been trying to learn PowerShell so I went to a book store with the initials BN to see what I could find. Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer to have hard copies of books. While I was there I wanted to look for books on my hobbies of photography and astronomy. This particular store only had one PowerShell book in a very small computer section. It had no astronomy books in its even smaller science section. I got so frustrated I forgot to look for the photography books. You would think ...
I just heard about Justice Gray's blog challenge from the latest episode of Hanselminutes while running today. Although I think his plan to read one developer book a week for the next six months is rather insane, I agree with the premise that setting specific goals publicly is probably the best way to hold yourself accountable. Here are my goals for the next 6 months: Add Tools to my Developer Toolbox - My productivity and troubleshooting skills would plummet if I were to suddenly stop using utilities ...
As part of my quest to become a better developer, I've been reading more tech books (ok I'm trying to finish ONE tech book without lapsing into a coma, but I digress.) The thing is, it's a Java book. Technically it's a design patterns book, but all the code is in Java, so call it what you want... Anyway, in my polylingual travels, I've been converting all the code in the book to vb.net for fun and to make sure I actually get what I'm doing. So today I stumbled across the Java keyword Volatile. I ...
Debbie Carter who teaches AP Computer Science at Lancaster Day School in Lancaster, PA has put together an excellent resource book for AP Computer Science Teachers. You can get the book at apcentral.collegeboard.com. I've worked with Debbie as a member of the now defunct Microsoft Faculty Advisory Board and presently as a Board Member for the Computer Science Teachers Association. The book contains information that will help both a beginner teacher and veteran teachers as well. It has five chapters ...
My friend Nick Malik recently posted about programming, contracting and pay. There's a book here somewhere, but sadly it has no audience, and therefore not worth writing. Programmers seem to have a genetic defect when it comes to understanding the relationship between their efforts and their pay. It's not going to happen, they don't want to, and you can't make me. Personally, I think that it's a crime that "From Serf to Surfer" is out of print. It was one of the best consulting "pull yourself up ...
I'm coming up to the midway point of my "How I am becoming a better developer in 6 months.", and I have a bit of catching up to do. Oddly enough, what I should have done is add in an area called "Get my passion back", although in April I don't think I would have posted "quit my job and go independent" as one of the goals. Anyway, I had a goal of reading a couple of tech books a month, but I'm just now starting to sink my teeth into some relevent geek-reading over the last month and a half. One of ...
I've been impressed by the attention paid to discoverabiltiy in powershell, which has allowed me to quite a bit of learning without ever leaving the command line. Here are a few of my favorite features: Guessing - This may seem strange to list as the number one discoverability feature, but I think the Powershell design team did an excellent job of exposing functionality through well scoped cmdLets that are logically and consistently named. With cmd.exe, the majority of the heavy lifting is done by ...
Dennis Gobo explores the misunderstood SQL TRUNCATE TABLE statement. He starts by first exploding the myth that TRUNCATE TABLE is not logged. He even uses the Books On-Line (amazing idea, reading the documentation) to back up his assertion. From Books On-Line (emphasis mine): TRUNCATE TABLE removes the data by deallocating the data pages used to store the table's data, and only the page deallocations are recorded in the transaction log. The DELETE statement removes rows one at a time and records ...

Please find the information about downloading & updating sql-server 2005 books online in the below mentioned msdn website.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms166018.aspx

George recently threw down the gauntlet to me and Jason and a few other folks, to challenge ourselves and stretch beyond our comfort zone to become better developers. So if I properly understand this latest blog frenzy, I'm supposed to pick four things that I'm going to do in order to become a better developer. I'm supposed to publish those four things in my blog, so that I'll be accountable for them. (ok seriously, if I lived up to even HALF the crap I've promised in this blog over the years... ...
Over the last year or so I have noticed a disturbing trend brought about by the idea of "brining programming to the masses". Last April, according to Microsoft, there was a "growing community of 18 million recreational and hobbyist developers." Even IBM was getting in to the mix, with a project called QEDwiki. I am a professional developer and have been a developer for over 14 years. I have a B.S. degree in Computer Science, did an internship at Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin) while in school, ...
Today marks the start of my journey to becoming a better developer. I am telling you all about it so that I can be held accountable for things I am about to say. I did not want to over think this but I did want to do things that challenged me as a developer on a variety of level. This is the current list of 6 months goals. I will not remove anything from this list, but I may add to it as I begin this journey to improve as a developer. I will read 1 technical book every month for the next 6 months. ...
This example uses adventure works sample database and reports, please refer to books on line for setup instructions. 1. Open Visual Studio and create a console application (VB or C#) 2. Replace the code in Module.vb or Module.cs with the appropriate code snippet a. C# using System; using SoapAPI.ReportService2005; class Module1 { public void Main() { ReportingService2005 rs = new ReportingService2005(); rs.Credentials = System.Net.CredentialCache.... rs.Url = "http://Localhost/reportser... ...
Ok, I am an avid fan of superhero movies. I love 'em, I really do. Been a comic book fan for ages. Many a pre-teen and adult dollar has been spent to enjoy yet another adventure with the men and women of comics. The colours were bright, the heroes good, the villains very bad, and the fun most excellent. I was never much of a Fantastic Four fan, though. I didn't dislike them, necessarily, I just never liked team books much. Teams were harder to follow, and honestly, I didn't identify with them very ...
This example uses adventure works sample database and reports, please refer to books on line for setup instructions. 1. Open Visual Studio and create a console application (VB or C#) 2. Replace the code in Module.vb or Module.cs with the appropriate code snippet a. C# using System; using SoapAPI.ReportService2005; class Module1 { public void Main() { ReportingService2005 rs = new ReportingService2005(); rs.Credentials = System.Net.CredentialCache.... rs.Url = "http://Localhost/reportser... ...
In my job at Microsoft, I am forced to be a generalist, knowing about all development topics. I find it too easy to allow myself to find excuses to not commit the time to go deep and completely understand a topic. But sometimes along come some very intriguing topics that really peak my interest. The current set of technologies in the .net framework, specifically WCF, WPF, WF, and Cardspace were the first to grab my attention. And the Next Gen web UI stuff in the form of Silverlight really needs a ...
I've spent the last couple of weeks re-reading the first 6 books in this series, partially as a refresher, but also to see if I could find any clues as to what's coming up. One of the ways I searched for clues was by looking for unanswered questions, of which I've found quite a few. Another way was noticing the tone and foreshadowing clues. I'm sure that I've included some questions that are unlikely to be answered. The ones that I think are likely to be answered are in bold, and the ones that I ...
I already had the book xUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code on my Amazon wishlist. But after reading Sam Gentile's xUnit Test Patterns and evolving TDD and test automation post today about the book and its topics I've decided to go ahead and order it now. I still have 3 books that I am currently reading ( 1, 2, 3 ) but this will jump to the front of the line when it arrives. EOF Technorati tags: TDD, xUnit, Test Patterns ...
*Moved to: HTC TouchIf, like me you are a fan of Pocked PC mobile phones you will have something like the Orange SPV 3100. Like me you will probably not really rate these devices as phones, but it beats carrying multiple technobits in your pocket. You can use it for pictures, email, mp3 (until the Zune is released in the UK), reading books (using MS Reader), browsing the web (its not a bad as you would think), and many other things that you require extra software for. What many users of these devices ...
Charlotte .NET University Code Camp was a great success Have you heard about .NET University (www.dotnet-u.com)? It provides presentations and hands on labs for WPF, WCF, WF and Cardspace. We built our spring 2007 Code Camp on that content. We started by offering two .NET U tracks but had to expand to three. We also offered a presentation track and an XNA hands on lab track. Our presentations included Orcas and LINQ, SharePoint and ASP.NET sessions. All sessions were very well received. Our facility ...
In SQL Server T-SQL, you can follow a table name with a table hint. The formal syntax is: WITH (table hint) But, for backward compatibility reasons, WITH is optional. So, these are equivalent: select * from Person.Contact with (nolock); select * from Person.Contact (nolock); But, what does this do? select * from Person.Contact nolock; Most likely, not what you want. This query aliases Person.Contact as nolock. Unlike the first 2 queries, it will obtain a shared lock on all the data it touches. This ...
Recently, I blogged about Alice and since then I've been exploring the different books that you can get to use while teaching Alice. The book that I'll be using with my students is called Learning to Program with Alice by Wanda Dunn, Stephen Cooper, and Randy Pausch. ISBN 0-13-187289-3 Pearson Prentice Hall. The book comes with instructor resources and sample syllabi which I found to be very helpful. The book is broken down into 4 parts. Part 1 is an Introduction to Alice; Part 2 Object-Oriented ...
At my current assignment I'm in the process of starting a brown-bag study group. Here's the announcement I sent out to all the relevant parties I could think of at my work. ***************************... Next Thursday (May 17th) we’re kicking off a lunch time study group for anyone who is interested. We’re going to be starting with “The Pragmatic Programmer: from journeyman to master” by Andrew Hunt and David Thomas. This is one of those books that seems to stay at the top ...
<reposted from my old blog> My CommunityServer site is acting up a bit as it won't allow me to edit any of my posts. I thought it was a permissions error but after digging around for a bit I still can't find what it could be. I was going to spend some more time finding out what is wrong then I figured I could just use SQL Enterprise Manager to view and edit the text, which sounded simple enough. Instead I ended up learning a bit more about nText columns in SQL Server and how to write text to ...
My friend Tim Hibbard recently posted why he doesn't use open source code in production applications. Now it is known to most people that I am a huge believer in Open Source Software, (I have even been told that I live and die by it) so I feel compelled to respond to his recent post. I am going to go through the post and respond to the bits that get me the most rilled up. "I don't feel comfortable using third party code because I don't always know the author's true intentions. " ... "The third reason ...
The war for which .NET language will reign supreme just got a little dicier folks. For a while now everybody has been slowly moving toward C# as the defacto .NET language of choice. Big names in the .NET world have been showing off coding samples in C# for a long time, books have been filled with C#-only samples...it seemed that we were all moving toward a new future where semi-colons and curly-brackets would reign supreme. That was...until now. The VB.NET team has launched a new weapon in its quest ...
Subtitle: Oracle vs. MySQL As I posted before, I have been tasked with converting a large block of Oracle stored procedures to MySQL. As you might expect, MySQL won out over Oracle in the "bean counter test" (accounting and administration procurement project approval) because it cost $5K vs. over $100K for Oracle. So we were basically told to use it. Opportunity cost of the extra time to learn it, code it, and the possible risks were voiced but not considered in the decision. The vast difference ...
The guys over at Xceed, makers of the powerful yet free Xceed DataGrid for WPF have just launched the WPFwiki. The wiki was created to be a community resource for developers working with Windows Presentation Foundation. Even though the site was just launched, the idea started in 2003 when the WPF DataGrid was just starting to be developed. As the developers encountered problems and questions that they felt would be of common interest, it was recorded in a database along with the answer. In March ...
Justice started a little challange, and i'm answering the call! Basically the idea is about accountability: what are you doing on an ongoing basis that is increasing your skills as a developer? Justice has pushed the envelope somewhat...he's going to be reading a book every week from now until October. That's very aggresive and shows his determination, focus, and apparantly lack of any sort of life outside the range of his Macbook's screen. (Note that one of his books is "MaxOS: The Missing Manual". ...
I'm keeping to my original decision. I haven't looked at any game development stuff at all, with the exception of some late-night work on Heroic Adventure! (as I said I would.) For example, I haven't looked at the new XNA refresh, though if you would like to, it's being splashed across every mildly game dev related blog between here and Seattle. You should have no trouble finding it. Most of my days lately, when not being threatened by crazed store owners, I have been studying my butt off for the ...
WPF book: Windows Presentation Foundation unleashed This book has been praised a lot by WPF experts I talked to, so I decided to purchase it, and I just got my copy. So far I had been working mostly with the well known WPF book by Charles Petzold, and thought it would be good to have another reference. The first impression is excellent. The book is very colourful and seems quite easy to read. The approach seems quite different from Mr Petzold's book. Instead of concentrating on C# code first and ...
Now I was looking for something completely different, but I happend upon this little Gem - 6 Steps to a Simpler Network - courtesy of the MCP Magazine 6 Steps to a Simpler Network There's a saying in IT that "complexity is the enemy of security." It's also the enemy of efficiency, troubleshooting and other critical network functions. Here are six ways to untangle that crowded web you've weaved. by Bill Heldman May 2005 Has your single LAN of the '90s evolved into a gargantuan enterprise? If your ...
This post is about two things. 1. I'm getting out of game development for a while. As much as I was actually into it in the first place, that is. I'll still be working on HA! in my spare time, at my own pace, but that's pretty much it. No new projects. I just don't have the time to keep fiddling with XNA, or the $$ to keep buying absurd amounts of books on Game Dev, etc. FWIW, I always said I'd rather be NEAR the game dev industry than IN it, and lately too much of what I've tried to do has felt ...