Tag | computer science Posts

This is my first post in this new year and was thinking about a topic to write on. Lately I have been working on varied things that flexes the brain muscles and things which I haven't done before. So a lot of learning and some unlearning this new year. One of the big issue which most people faces is learning to learn!.So, today I will share my experience of how I go about learning a technology, a skill or anything you want. The first and foremost thing is the motivation. This thing is very personal ...
I’ve just published three webcasts looking at AppFabric Messaging, Introduction to Azure AppFabric Queues, AppFabric Duplicate Message Detection and AppFabric Messaging Message Expiration. There are more webcasts on the AppFabric June CTP here. This article will take a look at the code used in the duplicate detection webcast and explain the concepts involved. Bear in mind that this code is based on the AppFabric June CTP, things may change when the production version is released. AppFabric Duplicate ...
Today I got to play with NASM. This is an assembler and disassembler that can be used to write 16-bit, 32-bit & 64-bit programs. Let me say upfront that the last time I looked at assembly code at any depth was when I was studying Computer Science in Pietermaritzburg – ten years ago – and we never ever got to touch any real assembly code so a lot of what I am looking at today is very new to me. The first thing I did was download NASM compiler. This turned out to be a bit more complicated than ...
While many of my colleagues are fascinated in constructing the ultimate ViewModel or ServiceBus, I feel that this kind of plumbing code is re-invented far too many times – at some point in the near future, it will be out of the box standard infra. How many times have you been to a customer site and built a different variation of the same kind of code frameworks? How many times can you abstract Prism or reliable and discoverable WCF communication? As the bar is raised for whats bundled with the framework ...
Malcolm Anderson blogged about “Einstein’s Razor” yesterday, which reminded me of my favorite software development “law”, the name of which I can never remember. It took much Wikipedia-ing to find it (Hofstadter’s Law – see below), but along the way I compiled the following list: Amara’s Law: We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run. Brook’s Law: Adding manpower to a late software project makes it later. Clarke’s Third Law: Any ...
I made a mental note from earlier in the year. Microsoft literally buys computers by the truckload. From what I understand, it’s a typical practice amongst large software vendors. You plug a few wires in, you test it, and you instantly have mega tera tera flops (don’t hold me to that number). Microsoft has been trying to plug away at their cloud services (named Azure). Which, for the layman, means Microsoft runs your software on their computers, and as demand increases you can allocate more computing ...
If you are in the Orlando, FL area during the first week of May then you should head over to the Orlando DotNetNuke user group meeting. Nik Kalyani will be the speaker and you will learn a great deal from him. DotNetNuke Module Development with the MVP Pattern This session focuses on introducing attendees to the Model-View-Presenter pattern, support for which was recently introduced in the DotNetNuke Core. We'll start with a quick overview of the pattern, compare it to MVC, and then dive right into ...
I’m proud to announce that two Microsoft employees, Sarika Calla and Kevin Halverson, who works on the Visual Studio Product Team will be visiting various User Groups and Companies in Arkansas and Texas! Bios: Sarika Calla – Speaking about a Woman’s perspective at Microsoft, this natively born Indian holds a Masters in Computer Science from Georgia Tech and has been with Microsoft for the past 8 years. Sarika is now a Team Lead on the IDE Team. (pic is Redmond sacalla mthumb.jpg) Kevin Halverson ...
Yesterday I posted the following as attention getter / advertisement (as well as my feelings). In the groups, (I am in) on the social networking site, LinkedIn and boy did I get responses. I am fighting mad about (a figure of speech, really) not having a job! Look just because I am over 55 and have gray hair. It does not mean, my brain is dead or I can no longer trouble shoot a router or circuit or LAN issue. Or that I can do “IT” work at all. And I could prove this if; some one would give me at ...
If you’re like me, you might see the open source Eclipse IDE as a copy or, more generously, a port of the Microsoft’s Visual Studio for the non-.NET world. It’s not that Microsoft invented the IDE (I would credit Borland with that), but they really took the idea and ran with it for the first version of Visual Studio .NET in 2002. The question is whether someone outside of Microsoft could take the modern IDE yet another major step forward in both principle and productivity. I think that has actually ...
Tim Bass posted on ‘Orwellian Event Processing’. I was involved in a heated exchange in the comments, and he has more recently published a post entitled ‘Disadvantages of Rule-Based Systems (Part 1)’. Whatever the rights and wrongs of our exchange, it clearly failed to generate any agreement or understanding of our different positions. I don't particularly want to promote further argument of that kind, but I do want to take the opportunity of offering a different perspective on rule-processing and ...
The area of computer science education is one that I have felt quite strongly about during my professional life. In the last 10 years, I have witnessed a number of projects where toiling through legacy code with legacy development habits was a normal and accepted way of working. However, it’s surprising that these kinds of habits often originate in university classrooms. This is where the debate over Software Carpentry comes into play. How can effective software development skills (such as producing ...
As a programming teacher one of the things that often comes to mind is; how can I teach programming in a way that is interesting and dynamic? Very recently I came up with a plan that I hope will address this idea. My plan is to add a new and exciting programming course called "Game Development and Programming with XNA" to our course offerings. Coincidentally this morning I came across an interesting article in the Science Daily that really connects with many of the thoughts I have had related to ...
I love to see new user groups created but as a Geordie I'm especially pleased to hear of the creation of North East Bytes (NEBytes) - http://www.nebytes.net . The intention is to help Developers and IT Pros in the community with the constant battle to learn, stay current and broaden their knowledge. They meet every third Wednesday of the month at Newcastle University which happens to be where I did Computer Science – which brings back fond memories of the bar and the (very dangerous but hugely fun) ...
It's Saturday, so I feel like writing about how I got started in technical writing. I took a computer class in high school and really liked it. I then took all the computer classes in college that I could. I was a business major at the time, but the computer classes were more appealing to me. When the school created a bachelor's program for computer science, I jumped in. I became one of the computer lab assistants, and my professor noticed that I also had a knack for describing how to do things. ...
Hello. My name is Mark Metcalfe and I have been a technical writer and technical writing manager since 1984 when cut and paste meant scissors and tape. A lot has happened in and to the world of technical writing since then. In 1984, most technical writers came from backgrounds like education, biology, English majors. I have a bachelors degree in computer science and there were precious few of us then. It seems that anyone who could show writing prowess could get into the technical writing field. ...
So I just spent an hour attending the DotNetNuke Corporation Webinar entitled DotNetNuke Demonstration. Needless to say, I'm a fan of DotNetNuke and I can't get enough knowledge of the product. Nik began the session by defining what the product DotNetNuke is and how easy it was to design a site. He then gave a brief explanation of the community and professional version of DotNetNuke. Next, he spoke briefly of the technology used which consisted of DotNetNuke, ASP.NET, .NET. IIS, a Windows Server ...
Will Strohl was able to get Joe Brinkman from the DotNetNuke Corporation to do the Keynote at the Day of DotNetNuke to be held next month in Tampa, FL. Joe Brinkman Joe Brinkman (MVP) is a co-founder and the VP of Core Technology of DotNetNuke Corp. With over 22 years of IT experience and a Computer Science degree from the United States Naval Academy, he brings broad experience in a variety of software and hardware architectures. Joe was the CTO for DataSource Inc. where he led the development of ...
I am a Computer science student and there is a big Question mark of what i'll do in summers. Ofcourse,I have some projects to do ,But even then i would like to get some internship.A fun and learning opportunity at the same time,i can earn too.. But this recession has really affected my internship hopes.. Companies like Microsoft,Google are giving paid internships to Phd Students only and i am a pursuing undergraduate from not so famous college. ..And they require some big references which i am not ...
I ran into Jessica at the MVP Summit and again recently at the Roanoke Code Camp, where she gave some BI talks. Jessica is an interesting person who not only codes in VB, but she digs sci-fi as well. Definitely a geek after my own heart. Check out these NINE Questions with Jessica M. Moss: 1. We’ll start off with an easy one… where are you from? I’ve lived most of my life in, and I still consider my home base to be, a little Virginian town called Culpeper. With my current job and an hour long drive ...
Was thinking about this paper the other day while I was in a conversation and thought it would be cool to post it on the blog since it is one of my favorite computer science papers ever and is written by none other than Ken Thompson.

http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/ken/trust.html
I enrolled in the software engineering program at Arizona State, primarily because that program was willing to take me without having completed an undergraduate degree in computer science (the M.S. Computer Science and M.C.S. programs were not). But as I went through the process I decided that I wanted to complete a thesis instead of a project, and I found a topic that I wanted to pursue that was clearly out of the realm of what I would consider software “engineering.” So I began working on undergraduate ...
Chippewa Valley .Net User Group Tuesday, Mar 10, 2009 at 05:00 PM Location: GreenMill Restaurant Directions Generating code for large-scale architectures is a complex topic. This talk will discuss ways to integrate the ADO.NET Entity Framework into your architecture’s code generation process and have it perform the “heavy lifting” in your Data Access Layer. We will cover an introduction to the framework itself and discuss some of the potential pitfalls (and how to avoid them) when using it in large-scale ...
I just finished my weekend read of Joel Spolsky's book on finding and hiring the best software developers, Smart & Gets Things Done. This is a must read for people responsible for bringing in new software developers. Although his approach is slanted toward finding developers for a product-oriented software development shop versus a corporate I.T. development shop, Joel covers a wide variety of topics from delving into the thoughts and motivations of a typical developer to practical suggestions ...
Few days ago, a friend of mine, sent me set of demonstration questions for 11th grade computer science students from Russia. I throw eye on this exam and decided to use some of those questions to test candidates in my company for hardware engineer position (we’re looking for). If you’re good candidate for this position, you should be able to answer all those questions without even think a minute. You can also try to solve it >> ...
This is one interview question I ask in every interview, and I get a lot of grief for it. I've done it for years. I used to work for a guy who was primarily a Delphi developer, and he as much as ordered me to not ask that anymore. I think it's a fair question. People who work in IT using an object oriented language should have a basic grasp on what the three tenets of Object-Oriented Programming are. If you work in an object-oriented language, you know what they are, but you may not know what they're ...
First of all, as a computer science trainer for many years, I'm biased to classroom training. As a trainer, you can see someone's eyes and determine if your students are learning concepts that you are teaching. I will adjust my presentation if needed so that the majority of the audience understands. There's always that minority that needs more help. Also, as a student, getting one on one help is the best way to learn. However, as you might know, there might not be a class in what you need to learn ...
In AJAX based applications its common that user might end up breaking your AJAX calls by clicking on numerous places in very short interval of time. Let us assume there is a page where there are several of hyperlinks which make WebService calls and do some stuffs on callback. If user clicks on five hyperlinks being impatient or may be just for fun, there will be five different WebService calls made. All of those calls had the same parameters or UI state while they were invoked. But on completion ...
Welcome to the very first post of Under The Influence (of code). I am Software Design Engineer based in SF Bay area. I have a deep and keen interest in Computer Science and Software Engineering. I've been wanting to start blogging for a long time now, but haven't been able to do so either due to schedule pressures an/or personal commitments and/or the lack of motivation thereof. I tend to do a lot of code prototyping and recently I was in need to some stuff I had proptotyped a while back, I searched ...
Well, I guess it's time to start blogging. I'm a .NET software developer crazy enough to get into WPF (like many others who stray from the land of traditional Win32 and Winforms programming. I'm also working full-time and thinking about going back to school for a computer science degree in the spring. I know I'm crazy, but I would really like a degree in something else besides humanities. At some point, hopefully very soon I'll post some of my frustrations...er...knowledge of WPF and .NET (what little ...

Yesterday featured another day packed with sessions and started with a great keynote showing off the new Windows 7, what's coming onto us with .NET 4 and the new development environments (starring Visual Studio 10) as well as innovations in the field of Office (web office is going to allow editing and synching documents online).

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Rob's one of my community buddies that I run into at various conferences and online of course. In addition to being a VB MVP, he's been around the UG and Code Camp scene pretty much since there was one. He's one busy guy, so I appreciate him taking the time to answer these NINE Questions. 1. Where are you from? I’m from Mississauga, Ontario. It’s a suburb just outside of Toronto, Ontario. I’ve lived there all my life. 2. What do you do? / Who do you work for? / What is your product? Give me the 10 ...
I met Lindsay about a year and a half ago at a user group event in Greenville, SC. She has the perfect job that keeps her very very busy but she was nice enough to take a few minutes and answer these NINE Questions. 1. Where are you from? I was born in Singapore, raised in Australia and Guam, went to college in Los Angeles, then Microsoft moved me to Philadelphia! On top of that, my mom was raised in the Philippines, and my dad is from Scotland. 2. What do you do / Who do you work for / What is your ...
I’ve been doing development professionally now for maybe 18 months and my experiences over the last 8 months in an agile shop have made me realise just how much there is to know in the development arena and, more importantly, how much I would like to know in order to be really creative in my job and produce truly excellent software. In my previous job, I used a text editor to write Perl. There was no such thing as unit testing and copying and pasting was viewed as an aid to productivity rather than ...
I have been pursuing when high school students will be getting the free software that Microsoft promised with the DreamSpark announcement back in February. I finally have been communicating with the team that is in charge of this and I've been told not to announce the release date but only to tell you that it will be soon. Real soon! The distribution will be different from what college students have been doing. The high school computer science teacher must register. The high school administrators/faculty ...
What this new blog is about Tech - I'm going to blog about technical stuff that interests / excites / confuses / frustrates me. Meta-tech - I'm going to blog about over-arching concepts and issues related to software development. Philosophical, architectural, social... I hope this blog will have an interesting slant because I started a new career as a software developer at the age of 33. It’s been a roller coaster ride over the last 2 years (so now you know my age) and I’ve had a chance to reflect ...
It is my intention to discuss topics pertaining to my professional experience, specifically my current work with e.magination where I often get the opportunity to implement business solutions using the latest Microsoft technologies. It is my goal to give back to the community and help others out who may run across the same types of challenges I have run into and solved and to foster discussions pertaining to the viability of different approaches to solving technical problems. Since this is my first ...
A Crash Course in HLSL (September 11th, 2008) Microsoft’s High-Level Shader Language (HLSL) is a shading language developed to give graphics programmers complete control over the graphics in their applications. This talk starts at the very basics explaining what a shader is, how it works, how to write one, and why they’re so important in the future of next-gen graphics. Speaker Matt Christian is a student at the University of Wisconsin – Stout studying Applied Mathematics and Computer Science with ...
Welcome back from Summer! The Minneapolis – St. Paul IIBA Chapter is looking forward to seeing everyone in September. At our meeting on the 11th, we will be providing important Chapter information, including announcements for our October 2008 meeting with SafeNet Consulting, Professional Development Days later in October and our Chapter Board of Director elections in November. We will also have information for those interested in participating in elections available at the meeting. Meeting Data and ...
If you’re reading this (and you’re not just one of my friends or acquaintances who is stalking me), you know you’ve done it. Yep, you know you have. You’ve spoken to someone or written to someone in various computer languages. It just happened here at /n software in an IM conversation between two of my co-workers, James and Tom. James is trying to get a group of people together to see the Pink Floyd Experience. James IM’d Tom in RSBScript (For you nerds that don’t know, RSBScript is an xml-based ...
Be sure to join us tomorrow night when we host Page Brook's talking about Silverlight! Not registered yet? Register here: http://gcnug-august.eventbr... This month’s meeting will start off with Pizza and then break into "Creating Custom Templatable Controls in Silverlight". Creating reusable controls is an important aspect of productive software development. When you can supplement this reusability with customizability, you have the power to rapidly deliver seamless and compelling user experiences ...
I have been awarded by Community Credit, for the monthly community contribution competition of July 2008. One of my main contributions for July 2008, besides blogging, moderating developer group etc, was organizing a panel discussion and seminar with 120+ students of American International University - Bangladesh. Along with Mr Enam Noor, we had a nice time with students, while providing them a guideline to get prepared for industry standard software development. Along with the support of my current ...
Welcome back after the chaos of last week. This time around, I'm talking to my very good friend Alan Jamieson (also known as Ripark in the gaming community.) Alan and I met back during my Reality Check Games days in Greenville, SC, where he was instrumental in helping to build a very strong gaming community. We've both moved on since then, but we'd both still rather be running a game store. Ahh memories... Anyway, without further delay, I give you NINE Questions with Dr. Alan C. Jamieson: 1. Where ...
Job Description: As a member of the IT Applications Development and Support team, the successful candidate will: · Work with a team to develop modules, reports and processes within SolArc’s RightAngle architecture · The candidate should have a good working knowledge of Right Angle IV · Interact with accounting and back office personnel to define and document their system and information requirements · Perform business and technical analysis and design of business requirements and generate functional ...
If you are concerned about your child's future employment, then check out this information: Computer Jobs Hit Record High CIO Insight (07/07/08) Chabrow, Eric U.S. information technology employment is approaching an all-time high as nearly 4 million workers are now employed in IT-related jobs, according to a CIO Insight analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. The IT unemployment rate increased one-tenth of a percentage point last quarter to reach 2.3 percent, but it is still near historic ...
At the Marriott Hotel in San Antonio, TX, there were close to 200 teachers from across the world attending the annual Computer Science Teachers Association Symposium. I have been fortunate to attend this event in the past as an attendee and as a speaker and I always look forward to it every year. I enjoy meeting new teachers and talking to them about what they are doing in the class. I also enjoy seeing old friends and the opportunity to learn something new at this event. My presentation was on Web ...
On Saturday, I'll be speaking to a group of teachers about how I use the open source portal DotNetNuke in my class. The event takes place in San Antonio and is sponsored by the Computer Science Teachers Association. The Computer Science & Information Technology Symposium provides professional development opportunities for high school and middle school computer science and computer applications teachers who need practical, relevant information to help them prepare their students for the future. ...
Agility Starts With Sales How many of us have had a sales rep sell us something we didn't need as a solution for a problem we needed solved and solved well. Everybody? That's what I thought. Often times, we as consumers get sold things that unnecessarily do more than just meet our basic need. Other times, we get told a product can do something when it can't. We want marketing to be enthusiastic about our software, but there are limits to everything. Better make sure marketing has actually used the ...
As the creative and interactive staff in my company are under my dictatorship... errrr care, I have had the opportunity to expand my understanding of what makes a great application in ways computer science can't teach you. I ran across a thought provoking article on A List Apart, that although targeted towards designers, could be generalized to any profession: http://www.alistapart.com/a... "Except for personal projects, self-expression has no place in design, but constraint is vital ...
Hello World!!! (again; I have a Myspace blog somewhere, along with an old unmaintained LiveJournal. Interested? It is political in nature, and the Livejournal I have is from an old position I took on a lot of things: positions I would never dare think now. Let me know if you want a link.) So I start another blog, on another server, someplace on the vast universe of the World Wide Web. What for? First, a bit about me. My name is Joeseph Smith. You may be saying, "Oh no, not another one!" Actually, ...