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I recently got checked out in Evektor SportStar. It's a two seat Czech built light sport airplane that becoming increasingly popular with the new sport pilot rules. I've been wanting to try it out for a long time but it's so popular that's always busy flying and booked well ahead. Apparently, many jumped on the sport pilot bandwagon as it's cheaper and faster way to get up in the air. At the same time some folks saving money during regular private pilot training as SportStar's hourly rental rate is lower than Cessna 172 and comparable to Cessna 150/152.

The preflight is simple and includes all typical checkpoints for 2-4 seat trainer airplane. The geared liquid cooled engine adds checking coolant level step. During preflight I noticed good quality construction and excellent fit and finish. The cockpit has adequate shoulder room and bubble canopy has plenty of headroom for over 6' pilot. In Texas heat though this greenhouse will fry you in no time, so keep it open as long as possible. Seats are firm and comfortable all controls are laid out well and within hands reach. Manual flaps extension handle is between seats and flaps position can be verified by the handle position only as the flaps are not visible due to wing design. Headset jacks located on the panel behind the seats and slightly to the right which all makes favorable condition for tangling headset wires with 5-point seatbelt harness.

Starting engine is very simple and once it's on there's only one throttle handle to operate, no mixture here. The vernier throttle control is something to get used to after Cessna's plunger type. I always wondered why all aircraft have such different user interfaces: panel layouts, control levers, switches grouping and locations etc. Why don't they create a few standards for critical controls. It would make pilot transition into new cockpits much easier and reduce workload especially during critical situations when motor reactions kick in. Anyways, the vernier lever must be twisted to smoothly adjust engine RPM (clockwise to increase ) and for abrupt changes can be moved back and forth after releasing the lock button. Almost as mixture control in Cessnas but loaded with push-in spring. The spring pushes throttle in pretty strong and engine response is quick, so be on your toes. And we complain about confusing UI in software. :)

Take-off roll is pretty easy, it doesn't require as much right rudder input as 172. Also, nose wheel is connected with rudder by rods so it's very sensitive comparing to mushiness of Cessnas. That makes one more transition gotcha from Cessna as you don't expect it react so quickly and can start yawing left and right during take-off roll. The trick is in quick smaller rudder inputs. Once at rotation speed it will lift off itself with just a hint of back pressure on the stick.

Once in the air - it's fun. The visibility is outstanding: high seating position, low cut sides, small engine cowl and all around glass canopy makes you like flying in the soap bubble. Steep turns are easy and stalls are non-event  -  it's just mushing around and sinks without noticeable wing drop tendency. No stall warning though, so watch your airspeed. Speaking of which it was about 40 kts when it decided to stall and I observed 95kts at 4500 rpm at cruise. I wish it had better radios, they suck in this airplane, constantly picking interference from TV towers or some other sources. Old Cessna's radios don't do that.

Landing was where I had most difficulties. The light weight makes it even less stable in turbulence than Cessna 150. And after 172 I had a tendency to overcontrol because of SportStar responsive controls. The throttle handle didn't help either and I was behind in making power adjustments. Geared engine RPMs are not the same numbers as for direct drive motors and it took time to find right approach power setting first times. It has three flaps settings: 15, 30 and 50 degrees. At 50 it makes quite steep approach and sinks fast when you loose speed. I used it twice but think it's better kept for short field landings. Most of the landings I've done with flaps at 30 and it worked best making it similar to 30 degrees flaps approahes in Cessna's.   Flaring is easy as long as you get new sight picture. The rollout was tricky due to it's highly sensitive nose wheel -  it can easily lead into pilot induced oscillation. Crosswind landing is different too as SportStar has a little wing clearance that limits amount of allowed wing drop in a side slip. This essentially dictates crab all the way to touchdown and kick-in the rudder in the last moment. Once rolling on mains keep the nose wheel off and don't forget to straighten it before it touches runway - it can take you to the boonies.

Once all of transition's trouble areas have been addressed the fun begins. It's nice vroom-vroom airplane for sightseeing and local trips. Makes a good trainer too I guess. It's new, comfortable, responsive, looks great in the air and on the ramp and easier on the wallet while building time (5gph fuel flow). It's good to see FBOs coming to understand the value of light sport planes and hope it will keep flying affordable.

Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 11:19 AM Aviation | Back to top


Comments on this post: Evektor SportStar Checkout

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Your observations are very accurate. I also enjoy flying the Evektor, except during cross wind landings. It takes some finesse, which seems backward for a sport aircraft. My biggest issue is it needs more speed for this catagory of aircraft. The Evektor's I've used have had great radios and flat screen instrumentation that is very professional. The Evektor guys at Fast Track Flight in Indiana are terrific. They know the airplane and are great instructors!
Left by Jim Shobert on Oct 29, 2007 4:54 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Well, just recently this particular plane I'm sitting in on the photo was destroyed in landing accident contributed by crosswind gust. The plane veered off to the side of runway and in attempt to recover pilot overcontrolled and lowered wing too much. Wing struck the ground and plane hard landed off the runway. It was dual instructional flight and nobody got hurt but the plane is totalled.
Left by Paul Petrov on Oct 30, 2007 12:39 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I purchase N506EV about a month ago. I have about 20 hours in type and I do like it very much. Like most little planes (and the sportstar is definitely that), the plane is prone to being pushed about by a crosswind. How could it not be? With the requirement of a 40 knot landing speed and a gross weight less then 1320 lbs, you are bound to get a light kite.

Having said that, I have found crosswind landings not difficult. You just have to follow procedure. You must realize that these planes can still fly at 50 kts so you need to keep the ailerons in the right place until you are under 30 kts.
Left by David Norris on Nov 05, 2007 11:44 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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David,

Congratulation on getting your plane. I'm not bashing one, it's a fun flying machine. My point was that just as with everything in aviation one has to carefully consider technical and personal limitations. This plane is light and lands slow so effect of crosswind will be higher than typical Cessna or Piper types. Plus, it has low wing and short landing gear legs thus we got less wingtip clearance for side slips. Just because of this it won't be able to handle as much crosswind as C172 for example. Add high pitch and roll sensitivity and we've got plenty to work on for pilots transitioning from conventional trainers. It looks like several touch'n'go won't be enough for low time pilots. They not only should work more on their crosswind technique but also reconsider limitations. I think it applies to any LSA more or less. Have safe flying!

Paul
Left by Paul Petrov on Nov 13, 2007 12:43 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I have been flying N412EV around NorCal - with exactly 14.5 hours logged in the past 8 weeks since my checkout on 9/30/2007.

N412EV is equipped with Garmin 496 including XM Weather/Music subscription. It is a joy to fly. I am a licensed private pilot who flys Cessna 150/152/172 most of the time. But the Sportstar is my favorite, and I can honestly say I am addicted. It is so responsive with all pushrod controls!

The best part is - no matter where I go - this plane *always* attracts other pilots and their questions (try that with a 30yr old Cessna). If I could get 120kts cruise out of it (instead of 100kt) - I'd be lining up to buy one even though I probably shouldn't. I'll probably go broke buying 10hr blocks - but I'll enjoy every single minute.

My 8yr old son loves to fly in this plane with me. The noise & vibration is very low, and the visibility is incredible (he uses a booster seat).

I flew/landed in the strongest wind so far (in this plane) this past weekend, 12kt gusting to 18kt & about 30 degrees out of Rwy alignment (call it 6G9kt crosswind). It is definately a little squirrely in this condition, but if you take your time and keep your feet busy - no problem. I usually look for 55kts on short final in normal conditions, 50kt over the threshold then let the speed bleed off in the flare. Carry a little extra speed in gusty conditions. Under normal conditions, every landing is like sitting down on the couch.
Left by Steve Wiley on Nov 30, 2007 12:59 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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PS - I'll agree that short wheel coupling makes tracking on the the roll out a chore. Combine that with the leaky brakes on the first gen models (which gives uneven differential braking) - and you just might find you're a good candidate for a taildragger rating by the time you get 30 landings in this bird

:-)
Left by Steve Wiley on Nov 30, 2007 1:03 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Well, I have a little over 50 hours on the Sportstar. Still have not managed to prang her yet. I carry two ten gallon ultralight jugs to the airport to put 93 octane autogas in her.

In general I like the airplane very much. I would only make a couple of changes to it. First, I do not like having to remove the cowling to do an oil change. I used to have an STC in my old Beech that allowed you to do that without removing the cowling. I also am going to get a nice gust lock for the plane. As standard, there really is not a gust lock for it.

I bought mine used, it was the dealer's demo. One thing that surprized me is how much I like the autopilot on cross-country trips. I would never have boughten it myself, but since it came with the plane, I have it. It makes cross countries easy to read maps, changes freqs, etc. without trying to fly straight at the same time.
Left by David Norris on Jan 02, 2008 11:14 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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My experience flying the Evektor SportStar (N712MF) could be described in almost the same words as this person's evaluation of his checkout of the SportStar. I almost bought the airplane because I was so excited about its looks, the way it flys, and the general concept of sport pilot flying. I am a private pilot and was the owner of a Cessna 150C (1963 straight-tail) until I sold it. I underwent cancer treatment in 1997 and haven't done much flying since. I thought the sport pilot category was just the ticket to getting back in the air, and since I have never had my medical denied, it is possible. After careful consideration of the price of the airplane, I decided it would probably be in my best interest to just rent instead, so I backed out of the purchase deal. Unfortunately, just before Christmas, I had an accident and broke my left leg, so I am on the mend right now, but I am looking forward to the day when I can hop back in the seat of N712MF and go flying. You're right, after getting used to landing the SportStar, you could be tail-dragger ready - pretty squirrely.
Left by Michael Morgan on Feb 05, 2008 10:30 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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+1 to landing being difficult ... I managed to bend one of RVAC's Sportstars by trying to land the nosewheel back in December.

http://www.solopassion.com/node/3804
Left by Duncan Bayne on Feb 23, 2008 4:51 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I am up to 29.3 hours total time logged and 16 different airports now in N412EV, with 53 total takeoff/landings - and haven't scared myself with it yet :-) It still attracts questions and admiration at all stops. My most recent flight was a tour of the San Francisco Bay with my son.

I only wish this plane was the newer wet wing version with more range. The leaking brake system has finally been fixed, leaving us with one less thing to worry about after touchdown. The plane is in the shop now for the annual, and we're looking forward to its return and many more flights.
Left by Steve Wiley on Feb 25, 2008 11:10 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I like the Sports Star but feel it is very squirley on take-offs and touch-and-goes. I feel that the Instructors should be up front with this. If not, then you might end up off the runway. It is hard to control once it starts yawing.
Left by withheld on Jun 07, 2008 6:23 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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What is the FAA desination for the Evektor SportStar? Such as a Taylorcraft is a BC-12D. Can someone answer this for me?
Left by Scott Carter on Jul 03, 2008 10:31 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Next to the J3, the Sportstar is the most fun a/c I've flown. And I've flown 7 or 8 different kinds including ultralights. The controls are so harmonious, I feel comfortable doing maneuvers with unusual attitudes. The maneuverability, visibility, roominess and instrumentation are outstanding. The key to landing in crosswinds is to get the nose wheel firmly on the ground quickly and set aelerons accordingly.

A wonderful airplane to fly!
Left by charles on Aug 17, 2008 11:14 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Hi the FAA desination for the sportstar is (EVSS) hope this helps
Left by Jared on Aug 20, 2008 8:45 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I own one of the two Sportstars in our local flight school. Both suffer terribly from poor brake system design. My airplane has been AOG for over a month, waiting for parts from the factory. Evektor seems to have disappeared from the planet, having become completely non responsive. We may need to change the entire braking system to get the plane back in the air, which of course requires approval from the factory! I love plane, but the company needs to get its act together if they plan to stay in business in the US. Flight school owners and investors beware!

If anyone knows where we can obtain the unique metric fittings for the brake system, or has any other ideas please let me know. Thanks
Left by Joe Horvath on Aug 28, 2008 8:43 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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The FAA designation for the SportStar is EVSS. I have transitioned from Private to Sport after so much hassle from the FAA on my medical. Once I transitioned I realized I probably should have never started with Sport Pilot instead of the private Pilot effort. Crosswinds landings are just fine under 7knots, but watch out for any tailwind on base or final. You'll float forever.


Left by Mike D on Sep 10, 2008 10:51 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I have read that evektor has replaced the brake system with a more standard system (I think Cleveland Brakes?). However, having said that, I really have not had too much problem with landing.

The plane is a bit squirelly, but aren't most light planes? I used to own a beechcraft musketeer and it was the same way. I think the reason for that is that when the plane just lands, there is not much weight on the wheels. sort of like being on ice. What I found on the musketeer was that you had to keep the yoke back, so that there was no weight on the nosegear and you immediately dropped the flaps, so there was more weight on the main landing gear.

That is exactly the technique I use on the sportstar. I land and I keep the stick in my belly, so I go down the runway with the nosegear off the ground. At the point I touch down, I take the flaps off. This reduces the lift so it puts more weight on the main landing gear. This makes the brakes more effective.

I do not let the nosegear down at all. I just let the speed bleed off until the nosegear comes down it by iteself. By doing this, the plane is steerable by rudder until the nosegear comes down and I don't use the brakes until the plane looses a lot of speed.
Left by David Norris on Oct 04, 2008 12:36 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I have heard from European sources I trust that Evektor is on the verg of closing and shutting down U.S. operations. So; buyer beware!
Left by Jake Sutton on Oct 08, 2008 4:12 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I have been informed also that Evektor has major money problems. The U.S. distributor in florida also ineffective.
Left by Milos on Nov 26, 2008 9:07 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Hello all, We started a flight club in Indy. The EVSS came w/a larger front tire. It handles alot better on TL and landings. You might want to try it on yours!! It is the same size that is on the mains.
Left by Withheld on Dec 09, 2008 5:36 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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The factory has a kit available to eliminate the sensitive nosewheel. Contact the factory directly as the US Dealer does not stock it. It takes 3-4 hours to install.
Left by Steve on Dec 23, 2008 3:13 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Our flight school, Skill Aviation, uses N912PV, a 2006 SE model with flat panel displays, the Garmin 496 with XM weather, and autopilot.

Until you become used to the sensitive steering, keep your heels planted motionless on the floor and pivot your feet from the ankles. That will limit the foot motion within a range that won't over control the pedals.

It is a light weight aircraft, but so are all the LSA's, plus Ercoupes, Cubs, Champs, etc. Master them and you'll be a better stick 'n rudder pilot.

If you're in the Chicago area, drop by and visit us at KUGN. We always have a pot of coffee on.

Best regards, Paul
Left by Paul Tanzar on Jan 02, 2009 11:54 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I bought a 2006 a few weeks ago and found Evektor USA to be hugely helpful and knowledgeable. They even had the canopy lock in stock. Most pilots transitioning from Cessna or Piper are used to high forces on the rudder pedals. I started with the Sportstar so I have no problems. I did order the kit to reduce nosewheel sensitivty anyway.
Left by Steve on Jan 21, 2009 3:45 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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EVSS? Where did that come from? I checked the official FAA listings and there is none for the Sportstar.
Left by Steve on Jan 21, 2009 3:46 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I now have 95.4 hours logged in SportStar N412EV in 149 flights - 167 full stop landings and 27 touch & goes. My longest Sportstar flight logged is 2.6 hours. My partner has flown N412EV on some long cross countries, with over 1200nm round trips over the Sierras, and operations from high altitude airports at max gross weight.

The plane now has 785 hours on the Hobbs, one of the higher time Sportstars in the US. We have had little trouble, mainly the brakes. We fixed that by completely removing the parking brake system and all associated plumbing with a Letter of Authorization from Evektor. Since then we have had no brake fluid leaks. However we did have one brake caliper/piston assembly come loose and end up damaged. It took several weeks to get the parts we needed. Now every pre-flight includes a good check of the brake calipers to insure they are secured properly. The newer SportStars have brakes from MATCO which should prove more robust and easier to service.

The gearbox is coming up on TBO in 15 hours. We have only used 100LL AvGas, so it will be interesting to see what shape the gearbox is in. We will also be installing the new thermostat for the oil cooling system which Rotax is offering free, to insure good oil temps. Our bird usually has low oil temps, especially in cold weather when it never gets into the green - and the new thermostat is supposed to fix that.

I have also heard people refer to EVSS as the FAA designator, but it does not show up in the official published list of FAA aircraft codes as of July 2008 (see link below)...

http://www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/Atc/Appendices/atcapda.html#atcapda.html.1

The airplane is a joy to fly! Hopefully Evektor remains a viable entity...
Left by Steve Wiley on Feb 08, 2009 11:53 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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DOes anyone know whatthe Faa call the Sportsstar since it does not tale EVSS? I put in EVSS on the cross country planner and it didnt take it.
Left by WITHHELD on Feb 11, 2009 2:32 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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The FAA designation for the Sportstar is in fact EVSS. It doesn't show up in cross country planners, like AOPA's, but that's what it is. Controllers ofter ask for the designation when I enter a TERSA. I can see them scratching their heads. They are not fond of Sportstars coming into busy airports with faster planes. We take too long to get down.
Left by Mike Deptula on Feb 22, 2009 1:12 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Years ago, I began lessons in a 152 cessna, soloe'd and did cross countries. Never went any futher, noww,, years later I'm starting over in a sportstar 407ev. The sportstar seems alot harder to land to me, but I only have a about 10 hours logged as of yet. It was bothering me, not to solo yet, but it's getting better each landing. The rudder is alot more touchy, and I don't think the narrow landing gears help much, compared to a 152c. With my instructor, I have had to deal with alot of cross winds, the grass strip has just been to wet. We took off one day, wind was stiff 15 kts direct cross wind, we went up, and practiced s-turns, turns about a piont, great day for stuff like that, but when we returned, and was 3 miles out, we checked in,, winds had picked up to 24kt cross wind,, after down wind, I approached like a emergency landing, and on final the instructor said put in a little more left rudder,, I told him there was no more. He said i think were at this planes limits (just what I wanted to hear) 2 weeks earlier, as both wheels touched down, a 19kt gust of wind caught us, and made left wing dip over and scrap runnway, just a little paint removal, but this landing went ok, only if it's ok to do s-turns on that white dotted line down the center of the runway :) I'm not sure that is going to be ask of me on the check ride, but I'm real good at it right now in the sportstar.
Left by Dwane on Mar 04, 2009 9:41 PM

# Evektor Sport Star - rudder pedals
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Take note of the rudder pedals. It is very easy to have the students right foot slip off his right rudder onto the instructor's left rudder pedal. During a recent lesson my student did just this on take off and we spun it. The airplane is totaled, but we are alive. This airplane has a horrible safety record.
Left by Scott Johnson on Apr 03, 2009 11:22 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Well, I have owned N506EV for over two years now. I have well over 200 hours on it and have not pranged it yet. I read some of these emails and I am a little perplexed.

First, your foot slipped off the right rudder onto the instructor's left pedal? Hmmm, I sat in my plane and tried to figure out how you do that? I was always taught that you keep your heels firmly on the floor and control the rudder. You would have to lift your feet off and reach across to do that. I guess you could, but that seems such a stretch. I really think any good instructor should prevent this from being an issue.

I would think the biggest safety issue with the plane would be the close coupling of the wheels. You have to be careful to keep the plane lined up. But, to be honest, it does not seem any worse then a Musketeer (but, they did have a lot of accidents, too).

Landing requires more skill then a cessna 150 because the plane is light. But, I don't consider myself particularly gifted and I can do it. I rate it harder then a Cessna 150, 172, and a cherokee. About the same as a Musketeer.

Secondly, the brakes are a problem. The pads need to be replaced every 200 hours I would guess. I use the rep out of pennsylvania and so far he has been good about support. At this point, I just don't use the brakes hardly at all. I land, led the speed bleed off on roll out.

I find it to be a nice cross-country plane. I have flow from Houston to Washington, DC to seem my children. Then, to New York. Then to Michigan (to see other relatives), back down the Mississippi to Houston. I fly high and average about 110 knots. I plan on 5 hour legs (I do carry a port a john). I use 93 octane whenever possible and so far have no issues with it.

Not a lot of mechanics are familar with the rotax 912. However, it has been so reliable and smooth it is hard to complain. I change oil every 50 hours. So far I have never had to add oil other then what I change at 50 hour intervals. In my old musketeer I had to add a quart every five hours. I use oil and filters from 800-Airwolf. They sell an oil formulated for the 912. The filter is a pain to change, though. There is not much room between the filter and the exhaust manifold and you have to remove the cowling to get to it.

No other fluid has every been a problem.


Left by David Norris on Apr 10, 2009 9:40 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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One other point, the oil temp does run low if it is cold out. However, I live in Houston and low temperatures are really rare. But, if I lived north, I would definitely check out the thermostat.
Left by David Norris on Apr 10, 2009 9:45 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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About Evektor USA and their viability and support, I just visited them a Sun N Fun and bought N150EV brand new. My impression is aht Evektor USA is a going concern and that they intend to have a very active presence from their Melbourn, Florida headquarters.
Left by Charlie Fitts on Apr 28, 2009 3:43 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I flew the 2007 Sportstar Plus today for the second time. I got check out in it on July 2 2009. I've been flying 172's since getting certified two years ago next month. I highly agree that the sensitivity of the rudder/nose wheel control on landing is EXTREMELY sensitive!!!!! Todays flight was touch and goes to get better skilled at my landings and dealing with the control of the aircraft upon landing.
I can say that its getting better. Other than that I love the plane!! Its fun, sporty, and looks great. Im 6'2 and with a headset I fit just fine. Any taller and Id say you'd have a problem. Took off today with my betterhalf and our take off weight was just over 1,100 lbs. No problem, took off with 15 deg flaps, and without flaps and saw over 800fpm climb from field elevation of 5100 msl and DA of 8,000. A quick run to the practice area at 6,500msl saw 94.9 kts on the Garmin 296. Although the Sportstar was getting tossed around like a dingy in the ocean, which is expected when temps are 85 plus, its still a joy to fly. Im looking forward to getting more proficient with the plane and taking some day or weekend trips.
Left by Russ on Jul 05, 2009 4:59 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I fly the 2007 SportStar Plus 923LA out of Dragonfly Aviation in Santa Rosa, CA and I agree it can be very squirrely on Take Off, not so much a problem with landings that's my only complaint. We haven't installed the nosewheel kit yet but hopefully that will make a big difference. I've flown other light sport aircraft and this plane does seem to be a little more sensitive on takeoff than the others (Zodiac 601, Remos, CTLS, Gobosh). I love this plane it is very maneuverable and takes off very quickly. Actually if you get into trouble by over-correcting on takeoff or Touch and Go you can save it by adding full power and getting the airplane airborne immediately, it will lift off the ground well before 50 Kts. The stall characteristics are amazing. I demoed accelerated stalls with 30 degrees bank and the plane handles beautifully no violent breaks to scare the students. My students really like this airplane too. Takes a little more time to teach takeoff and landings than the Cessna, but it's more fun to fly. A little bit slower but great visibility!
Left by Chad Simmons on Jul 11, 2009 5:18 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I installed the nose wheel kit to reduce sensitivity and it worked very well. I flew to Oshkosh from Fla. at MTOW plus a little and had no issues at all. I have about 50 hours in it and love this plane! I put memory foam inserts under the seat covers and it made a world of difference in comfort. I run 100LL and Decalin. Mine is a 2006 with 400hrs. of trouble free flying. I replaced the brake cylinders and lines with the latest pieces so no braking problems either. Now I am installing the VG's to raise the MTOW (kit available from factory). The office in Melborune,FL is excellent and very responsive. Can't say enough good things about them.
Left by Steve on Oct 24, 2009 5:23 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I now have 156 hours logged in N412EV, and 299 takeoff/landings. We had the gearbox serviced at 800 hours and it was a very quick turnaround.

We had the new oil thermostat kit installed, and the oil temp is now too high in the summer. The temp is now fine in the winter, whereas it never reached the green before - but something may have to be done again to find a happy medium. Otherwise, generally there are still no problems to speak of.

I have given EAA Young Eagle rides in this plane, and had countless other passengers. No one has stepped on the wrong rudder pedal yet :-) N412EV has logged well more than 800 hours on the HOBBS, and no one has accidentally stepped on the wrong pedal. The first several hundred hours were on lease-back to a flight training school - so there was ample opportunity to demonstrate a design flaw in that regard. In fact, the NTSB has recorded no other instances of this happening.

While I am sorry to hear about a totalled SportStar, I was humored to hear it referred to as having a 'horrible' safety record. The NTSB reports indicate otherwise.

There has been only ONE fatal accident recorded for the Sportstar by the NTSB, and it was clearly a case of pilot induced departure stall. Many of the accidents listed involve runway excursions, probably due to the touchy nature of the ground handling, well discussed here.

The pilot who reported the 'foot on the wrong rudder' accident failed to mention that the NTSB didn't list the probable cause as "the airplane has a horrible safety record" or even "the pedals are too close together" - not even as a casual factor. In fact you can read the report for yourself.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The pilot's inadvertent use of the wrong rudder during initial climb which resulted in a loss of control and collision with the ground"
http://ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20070910X01353&key=1

So far the ATC code 'EVSS' still does not show in the ATC publication. ATC wants to know how fast you can climb, descend, and what type of engine you have. This document gives them that information - and Evektor still is not listed:
http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/ATC/atcapda.html

If anyone can point to an official FAA publication which specifies the use of EVSS as the SportStar type code, it would be greatly appreciated.
Left by Steve Wiley on Jan 05, 2010 10:01 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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For those worried about the closeness of the pilot/co-pilot rudder pedals, Evektor has released a fix in the 'nosewheel steering sensitivity kit'. They have moved the co-pilot rudder a little farther away from the pilot pedal by using more 'bend' in the pedal.

You can see it on Page 17 of this bulletin.
http://www.evektor.cz/pdf/support/bulletins/SportStar/SportStar_Bull_009b_EN_Instruction.pdf
Left by Steve Wiley on Jan 05, 2010 10:16 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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And in all fairness to those whose call sign is 'Sasquatch', there is also a kit to install a barrier between the pilot/co-pilot rudder pedals...
http://www.evektor.cz/pdf/support/bulletins/EuroStar/Eurostar_Bull_014b_SpSt_13b_Pedal%20barrier.pdf
Left by Steve Wiley on Jan 05, 2010 10:23 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I had my second flight in a Sportstar last weekend with a fair amount of crosswind landing time. I found that 15 degrees of flaps and disipating as much energy as possible while rolling out on the mains provided the best directional stability on landing. Definitely a crab down to the last 10-20 feet agl. If you keep the nose wheel from touching until it drops naturally the tendency to over control is reduced.
Left by Frank Spicer on Jan 12, 2010 5:38 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Regarding "the pedals are too close together" - see www.evektor.com bulletin No.013b.
Left by Mike M on May 05, 2010 5:04 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Steve Wiley says there is only one fatal accident in the NTSB reports. I suggest you do a worldwide Google search... you will find at least THREE fatal accidents (six dead) and another with major injuries (my accident). 2007 ~ 2010 How many airplanes are in service? How do you define a "horrible safety record"? I know how I do.
Left by Scott Johnson on Jun 20, 2010 9:04 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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If you shut off the master, yes it will keep running until you turn off the ignition key switch! I installed the nose de-sensitizer kit and the VG's and still continue to love this plane. I am converting the brakes to Matco. Matco can supply a kit for approx $1400. It's worth it! I have N644S for 18 months and have about 100 hrs. in it. Will fly again to oshkosh this year.
Left by Steve on Jul 07, 2010 11:05 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Wow....it looks like the "going concern" Evektor Aircraft in Florida is out of business!
Left by Scott on Jul 12, 2010 8:39 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Left by Eric on Sep 06, 2010 1:50 AM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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Well, I have owned N506EV for over three years and have approximately 350 hours on her. I am used to the nose gear sensitivity so I just live with it. I find that I keep the nose gear off the runway on landing and use the rudders as long as I can. I minimize use of the brakes.

I have flown to Melbourne, Florida to see my son and, yes, I found the rep there is out of business. I flew from Melbourne to Washington, DC to see my children. From there to Fenton, Michigan to see my brother and then back to Houston.

The only maintainence issue I have had is that my voltage regulator failed. I have been told that the original is from a Ducatti bike and is of suspect quality.

I put more angle in my prop and it improved my speed and efficiency but cut my climb.

Left by David Norris on Nov 19, 2010 12:40 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I’m looking to buy a LSA, and have trained in a Piper Sport, nee Sportcruiser, which is great and easy to fly. Have any of you Evektor flyers flown the Piper Sport? If so, how does it compare?

The registration figures for the Sportstar show only 4 in the last two years. Add 4-5 more to account for de-registered planes due to mishaps and it’s still a low number compared to the first 3 years in which 88 Sportstars were registered in the US.

I know the economy is bad and it’s a much more crowded field now which includes Cessna and Piper, but these registration numbers seem very low.
Left by Craig on Dec 03, 2010 2:29 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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ps. In a Plane and Pilot magazine article from last month it looks as if the latest sportstar has decreased clean stall speed from 44k to 37 kts, widened main wheel stance, dampened steerable nosewheel sensitivity, and upgraded the brakes and canopy.

Too Late?
Left by Craig on Dec 03, 2010 3:58 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I flew a sportstar 12,000km from Melbourne to top of australia, along the wild northern top and down through the harsh deserts and back to Melbourne. I had two hours on the type , had not flown for seven years when I got my PPL, had no other previous previous x country experience, had the worse bush strips you could imagine, often with no wind sock, and somehow survived. I love this aircraft!
Left by sean on Dec 19, 2010 7:33 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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I have 30 hours in the C172 and haven't soloed yet. That's 30 hours from 1988-2007! I decided to take a step back from the C172 and try the Sport Star. I have only just completed my resubmition to the TSA. I am looking to taking 2 lessons a week, completing my training by late July 2015, now is mid May 2015. After reading all of the comments, I have come to the conclusion that extreme sensitive handling is required on landing as well as runway exit. Seems as though all the NTSB reports I have read have blamed a pilots heavy hand response to wind gusts upon landing and sharp turns after touch down. I love the aircraft, and at around $60k for a used 2007, its cheaper than most high end cars. I look forward to starting the search for my baby in Spring 2016..
Left by MarkH on Mar 22, 2015 4:59 PM

# re: Evektor SportStar Checkout
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having an SEL with high power and rg endorsements, I love the sporty-ness of this class a/c. It is so easy to crab, slip or both to a landing that one can be flown in almost any landing profile. Change to crab at last minute.

One does need to pay close attention to its crosswind envelope and the CG limits. It's so easy for two 6'1" 230 lb guys (including clothing) and full tanks with a 25 lb bag in back to blow the CG limits.

With the latest iPad and Android aviation apps and portable mounts anyone can have a glass display and the tablet gives you everything but the engine read outs and needle and ball. While not an FAA IFR system, it keeps your head up and off the chart(s). Easy hookup to ADS-B receiver etc.

The one thing that bothers me about buying an EV is the coming change to the 3rd class medical reqs which will open up a/c up to 6000 lbs and pilot plus 5 pax for SEL certificated pilots with only a valid driver's license. May also include IFR. So, I would shift back to PA-28s or C-172/182s.
Left by Mike Morrissey on Jun 12, 2015 4:15 PM

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