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This is in response to a comment about my last post.

 

I expected something revolutionary and significantly better than what was currently on the market.  Microsoft consistently does this with other applications.  Sql Server is, in my opinion, FAR superior to Oracle and MySql.  .net kick’s Java’s behind.  Visual Studio is so far ahead of the competition that using anything else is painful.  For those of you that live and die by Eclipse, VS 2005 is clearly a superior product.  The XBOX 360 is also much better than just about anything else, although the WII comes close in sheer fun.

 

So why isn’t the operating system and browser far superior to the competition?  Microsoft has 70,000 employees for crying out loud!  They had 100 or so developers working on WPF alone!

 

My point is this:  They started from the Server 2003 core and then modified it.  It took them 5 YEARS and it looks and feels like Service Pack 3 for XP.

 

Why couldn’t they have released this incrementally?  After all, we know that it can run without Aero, and we know that the .net bits can be back ported to XP, so why the large release?

 

There’s got to be a better way to do security.  Surely the smart folks at MS can come up with a way to monitor the intent of an app to determine that’s its going to do something that would be perceived as bad and notify the user appropriately.

 

The logic you used for why they are being restrictive is the same logic that people use to explain why communism is a good thing.  The “people” are too stupid to run their own lives, therefore, the big government must come in and do it for them.  I don’t buy that.  I think a better solution would be to anticipate when an application is going to do something bad and stop it and notify the user then.  No, that’s not going to be easy, but it’s possible.  Assuming that everything that touches something that some developer in a cubicle somewhere decided could possibly be used badly is something that should be blocked is stupid.  Start with that, but then take it another step.  Look what the change is going to be and if it is, block it (roll it back) and notify.  Yes, that's hard.

 

You should have a more user centric view of the world.  In general, software isn’t for the developers, it’s for the users.  Calling the users stupid serves little purpose other than demonstrating your lack of concern for your customer.

 

Software is for the user and should behave how the user expects it to, not force its will on the user.  The stuff that the user can’t see is only important if it meets that goal.  The general user population DOES NOT CARE about the bits inside of the machine.  They only care about whether or not the software helps them do what they want to do.

 

Software does “magically” develop from ideas.  Coming up with the ideas tends to be the hard part.  The “programming” aspect is merely a constraint of time and computing power.  WinFS was innovative, but it was cut.  Aero is a mac look alike.  WPF and WCF are innovative, but they’re not the “OS”.  Maybe my standards are too high.

 

Anyway, this is too long already.

Posted on Thursday, January 25, 2007 7:04 PM Work , Play | Back to top


Comments on this post: Response to Vista? That's it?

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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Your not alone in these feelings. If only WinFS made it into this build I may have consifered moving on over. =(
Left by Dave on Jan 25, 2007 10:15 PM

# You guys are missing the boat
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What's the big deal about Vista? It's not necessarily that it's a communist operating system, comrade. Maybe XP could use a service pack, but this isn't necessarily it. So what is it? Please read my posted reply:

http://geekswithblogs.net/lorint/archive/2007/01/26/104614.aspx
Left by Lorin Thwaits on Jan 26, 2007 2:55 AM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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People *are* stupid, it's a fact of life.

The reason there are so many security problems is because people *are* stupid.

The reason there are so many machines infected to the hilt with viruses and other malware is because people are stupid. I can almost guarantee that if I sent an email to everyone in my address book, along with a file attached called Virus.exe that on running played some semi-funny slideshow of captioned images whilst at the same time emailing itself to everyone in the address book and launching a DOS attack on www.microsoft.com - within a day it would be causing problems.

Even if we added some text in the email body, warning that a 'scan' of the attachment had discovered a potential threat - most people would still run the file.

I'm sure that you know the reason for this - yes, people are stupid.

My 2p - because I know that my dad would run it twice.
Left by Carl on Jan 26, 2007 9:19 AM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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I didn't want to completely take over your comment section, so I have posted my thoughts here:

http://geekswithblogs.net/rmogstad/archive/2007/01/26/104651.aspx
Left by Rick on Jan 26, 2007 10:00 AM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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One question, have you ever written in app in C or tried to write your own kernel level components (or heck, your own OS for that matter)? Or are you strictly a managed developer?
Left by Jason Olson on Jan 26, 2007 11:01 AM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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Seriously, you don't think there are revolutionary features in Windows Vista? How about Transactional NTFS? First fully ACID transactionally-aware OS in a major operating system. Then you add in the stability that this can bring when developers leverage it (and even the fact that our internal teams like Windows Update are using it), that's a big one. How about IIS7, more specifically Windows Activation Service and what that provides for WCF Services? I digress though as I'm starting to delve more into server features.
Left by Jason Olson on Jan 26, 2007 11:07 AM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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Hey Jason,

Not that I want to get into a huge debate about it, but how much of what you have talked about is relevant from an end-user perspective (one who does no programming or server maintenance)? That'[s where I think Vista falls down.

Left by Justice~! on Jan 26, 2007 12:23 PM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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"Not that I want to get into a huge debate about it, but how much of what you have talked about is relevant from an end-user perspective (one who does no programming or server maintenance)? That'[s where I think Vista falls down. "

Unless an end-user decides not to use any software except the OS, it has everything to do with the end user.
Left by Rick on Jan 26, 2007 1:03 PM

# re: Response to Vista? That's it?
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Jason,

At this point in my life, I am strictly a managed developer. I guess I've always been a managed developer, since I started in the VB and basic world.

My point is this, I was expecting more. For example, I would have loved to be able to move my windows in 3D space where I could decided how big to make them. So picture this, one window has been shrunken in size and the fonts and such proportionally shrunk, but then moved forward on the Z axis so that it's in front of other windows so that I can reference it while other windows are open.

Or how about turning the window on it's side and letting me stack them off to the side. Yeah, Flip 3D sort of does that, but I can't interact with it. Think Minority Report.

Transactional NTFS is cool, but honestly, I can't tell you the last time I had a file of any type corrupted, so that doesn't impact me much. I'm sure it does someone. IIS7 isn't really part of the OS. I know, it was made so back in the day, but I ran an ISP when IIS was still available for MAC, linux, etc. Plus, I've done enough DOM work to know that windows uses IIS, but calling it part of the OS is a stretch.

WAS is good, but you can you really not have WAS without vista?

Maybe as the OS progresses to more managed API's, the differentiation between what is OS and what is .net will increasingly blur. That's not a bad thing, but I really think MS needs to roll this stuff out quicker--shorter development cycles.

Finally, Vista is a great OS, and many of the changes are very good, but 2.5 years is a really long time to realize something isn't going to work. I do agree that scrapping something that's not going to work is good. ME should have gone that route . . . :)
Left by Robert May on Jan 26, 2007 2:24 PM

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